18th October 2014
rhamphotheca:

Fairy Slipper (Calypso bulbosa)
… an orchid sometimes called “Hider of the North.” Its vanilla scent tricks bees into thinking it has nectar, so they will stop, explore, and pollinate it.
C. bulbosa has a circumboreal distribution; in North America, it is found across Canada from Alaska to Newfoundland and in the northeastern and western United States. It produces a solitary basal leaf in the autumn which senesces soon after flowering. A solitary flower (rarely 2) is produced in the late spring, usually pink, magenta, or white, with a pouch-like labellum that can be spotted with contrasting colors such as yellow.
Its lateral petals and sepals spread distinctively outwards. In most of North America, it is found in wet coniferous or mixed forests and bogs; in the northwest, it is found in drier, shady coniferous forests…
( read more: North American Orchid Center)
Photo by Pamela Van Velsir

rhamphotheca:

Fairy Slipper (Calypso bulbosa)

… an orchid sometimes called “Hider of the North.” Its vanilla scent tricks bees into thinking it has nectar, so they will stop, explore, and pollinate it.

C. bulbosa has a circumboreal distribution; in North America, it is found across Canada from Alaska to Newfoundland and in the northeastern and western United States. It produces a solitary basal leaf in the autumn which senesces soon after flowering. A solitary flower (rarely 2) is produced in the late spring, usually pink, magenta, or white, with a pouch-like labellum that can be spotted with contrasting colors such as yellow.

Its lateral petals and sepals spread distinctively outwards. In most of North America, it is found in wet coniferous or mixed forests and bogs; in the northwest, it is found in drier, shady coniferous forests

( read more: North American Orchid Center)

Photo by Pamela Van Velsir

Reblogged from : rhamphotheca